Skip to main content

'Squid Game' is on track to be Netflix's biggest show ever

Squid Game
'Squid Game' has become a huge international success since its release on Netflix. (Image credit: Netflix)

Squid Game has taken Netflix viewers all over the world by storm recently, with millions of people tuning in to watch the new South Korean drama series. It's been so successful that it's now on track to be Netflix's biggest series to date, and could even take over the likes of Bridgerton (82 million), Lupin (76 million), and The Witcher (76 million).

As of Sept. 28, 95% of Squid Game viewers are outside of Korea so it's been dominating the international market. It's available in a number of languages and can be also watched with Korean audio and subtitles, so there's options available for everyone.

Following the success of the series, Netflix's co-CEO Ted Sarando revealed: "Squid Game will definitely be our biggest non-English language show in the world, for sure, and there’s a very good chance it’s going to be our biggest show ever."

The harrowing series follows desperate members of the public, each of which is riddled with debt and desperate to better their lives. When offered to take part in a tournament that has a massive 45.6 billion won prize (£28m) up for grabs, they agree, but there's a deadly twist.

Squid Game

In 'Squid Game', participants are given numbers to keep track of whether or not they're still playing. (Image credit: Netflix)

At first, the players believe they're simply playing large-scale versions of children's games against each other, and that all they have to do is avoid being eliminated from them. But it soon becomes apparent that elimination actually means death, and players begin risking their lives to get their hands on the money.

The series was created by director Hwang Dong-hyuk who is well known for his award-winning films like Silenced, Miss Granny, and The Fortress. He actually planned Squid Game for 10 years, so it's been a long-term project ahead of its big release on Netflix. 

It has been revealed that Dong-hyuk’s creative intent is to show the irony of how the good intentions of capitalism which meant to help people live well and prosper can actually harm people and result in brutal competition instead.

All nine episodes of Squid Game are available on Netflix right now.

Lucy Buglass

Lucy is a digital writer with WhatToWatch.com, where she writes series guides for must-watch programmes and the latest TV news. Originally from Northumberland, she graduated from Oxford Brookes University in 2016 with a degree in Film Studies and moved to London to begin a career writing about entertainment.


She is also a Rotten Tomatoes approved film critic and has a huge passion for cinema, setting up her own website Lucy Goes to Hollywood in 2017 to review films in her spare time. Her favourite genres are horror, thriller and anything crime related. When she's not writing about film and TV, you'll likely find her playing video games, reading, and trying her hand at podcasting.