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'WandaVision': Is Wanda inside the Stark Mainframe trying to find Vision's backup?

A black and white photo of a toaster, the text around reads "Forget the past, this is your future!" Toast Mate 2000 Stark Industry
(Image credit: Disney+)

This post contains spoilers for WandaVision.

What is WandaVision actually about? That's the question that we're all asking after the first two episodes of Marvel Studios' first ever TV series. So far, the sitcom-influenced superhero show has excelled at being weird and wonderful, while never revealing too much about its secrets. That doesn't mean we don't have theories, though! One of the most fun things about watching the Marvel Cinematic Universe films and those from their Distinguished Competition is deciphering the clues, mysteries, and puzzles left by the creative teams. That's particularly relevant in the case of WandaVision as the entire setup of the series is based around the audience not knowing the status quo of where we find ourselves and our strange heroes.   

After two episodes we're no closer to having a definitive answer to where Wanda and Vision are but we do have some potential hints that support a very out there but still quite possible theory. Before we begin to break it down, let's recap the last tragic time we saw Vision (Paul Bettany) and Wanda (Elizabeth Olsen). During the events of Avengers: Infinity War, Wanda attempted to stop Thanos by destroying the Mind Stone which sat in Vision's head and was the source of his life. Sadly, for the hero known as Scarlet Witch, the purple villain had the Time Stone, meaning that he just rewound time, plucked the Mind Stone out of Vision's head, and plopped it into his big gold glove. While we haven't seen what happened to the android's body after Infinity War, Paul Bettany recently revealed that Avengers: Endgame almost included a scene showing that Wanda is in possession of the empty shell of the (robot) man she once loved. 

That outcome would be logical. Not only in the comics we do get a resurrected version of Vision—known by fans as White Vision or Gray Vision—but also in the movies the pair are inseparable. The unstable nature of Wanda and her love for Vision mean that she would 100% have taken his cold metal body and kept it with her in the hopes of finding a way to bring him back to life. Which means, as we know, Wanda more than likely has Vision's body. And if she's looking for a way to bring back her soulmate, she would likely head back to Stark Industries. 

During the first episode we get our first hint that Stark Industries could be involved in Wanda's current predicament. As we watch the episode of the heroine's new sitcom-inspired life, there's an advert break. The product is a Stark Toast Mate 2000. While many eagle-eyed viewers noticed that its ominous red light and beeping could represent the Stark bomb which killed Wanda's parents, we think it could signify something else. Is Wanda stuck inside the Stark mainframe searching for Vision's original backup? During the events of Avengers: Age of Ultron, Vision was created using the Mind Stone, a new metal body originally meant for the titular villain, the magic of Thor's hammer, and most importantly for this theory the A.I. program known as J.A.R.V.I.S. If Wanda is trying to restore Vision, surely she would have gone back to the source of his personality, which would mean hacking into the Stark computer system. 

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If Wanda somehow used her powers—which in the comics consist of reality warping and magic—to try and locate Vision within the mainframe of the Stark computers, there's no reason that she might not have either gotten trapped or even ended up manifesting the program into a fully blown alt-reality. While it might sound like an outrageous explanation, there are actually multiple moments that support this theory. Think about the setup of the show, each episode seeming to take place in a different era. This could be explained by Wanda exploring the decades of data that are stored in the Stark mainframe. It could be why we saw the strange Stark commercial for the outdated technology, as well as why Wanda's own memories and trauma seem to be getting intertwined with the out of time world she's found herself in. 

The biggest clue of course—aside from the fact Wanda is literally trapped inside a television—is that in the world of WandaVision Vision actually exists. He's funny, clever, witty, and just as in love with Wanda as ever. This is exactly what she wanted, but how did it occur, especially without the Mind Stone? The most obvious answer is that Wanda is somewhere where his personality and programming is still functioning. This theory would also explain why we're seeing so much HYDRA. As far as we know, the Nazi terrorists were defeated after Captain America revealed they had infiltrated S.H.I.E.L.D. in Captain America: The Winter Soldier. And yet here they are in the guise of the Strucker watch commercial in episode two, and the appearance of the beekeeper at the end of that same episode. In the comics, A.I.M.—the one time science arm of HYDRA—are known by their yellow biohazard suits which look just like those that are worn by beekeepers. Wanda could have all of this knowledge herself, but it could also just be more data backed up in the Stark mainframe that has manifested itself into reality. 

It's important to point out here that it wouldn't be the first time that a computer program jumped out of the screen and became a reality changing and potentially world ending threat in the MCU. Remember the previously mentioned Avengers: Age of Ultron? The entire film is based around an A.I. who gains sentience and is disgusted at the way humans have ruined the world and decides to end them. But that's not all. We also get the creation of Vision, himself once again a computer program who later became something close to a human being. While the MCU might look like our world, it's actually a high fantasy space where people can fly and computers might just take over the world. Or, in WandaVision's case, suck you inside them. There's a final aesthetic clue that Wanda might be trapped inside of some kind of Stark technology which comes at the end of each episode. After we leave the TV show, we zoom through a credits sequence that looks very much like we're flying over a computer motherboard. It could just be a cool design choice... or maybe a hint at where Wanda is actually lost?