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The best Amazon Prime shows

The Boys Promo Image
(Image credit: Amazon Prime Video)

While none of us really care for Jeff Bezos, the majority of us still maintain a continuous Amazon Prime subscription - or, let's be honest, use our parents' accounts. With Amazon Prime comes its streaming service, Amazon Prime Video, and inside are a whole host of goodies. Whether it's original content or the films and movies they've scooped up with those Amazon dollars, the platform has a pretty robust catalogue of content. It could keep you occupied for days; but where to start? Well, my friend, if you're looking for some show recommendations I have just the thing! 

The Boys

The Boys took the world by storm with its first season. In a surprising turn of events, its sophomore offering was somehow even better received (despite some fan “outcry” over the fact that the show would drop weekly rather than all at once). The series follows Billy Butcher (Karl Urban) and his band of outcasts as they try and take down the nefarious Supers who try to present themselves as the heroes of humanity. Behind it all is the nefarious Vought International and their very special Supe drug Compound-V.

Hunters

Based in 1977, Hunters follows a group of Nazi hunters living in New York City. Early on, they discover that a group of surviving Nazi war criminals are planning a Fourth Reich in the United States. During their attempt to hunt down the Nazis, the hunters discover Operation Paperclip. Said operation is based on the very real Operation Paperclip in which the United States government worked to relocate German scientists. Logan Lerman and Al Pachino both put together stellar performances as Jonah Heidelbaum and Meyer Offerman in this bloody – and sometimes offensive – series.

Lore

Lore feels like one of the best kept secrets in the horror genre right now. The series, based on Aaron Mahnke’s podcast of the same name, follows the anthology format with each new episode telling a unique story. Those stories tie into, you guessed it, tales of folklore. It combines documentary footage with the usual cinematic scenes you’ve come to expect out of scripted content, and brings some real spooky stories to the table. The series only has two seasons, so this one is an easy commitment for anyone who’s not looking to dive into anything too deep.

Good Omens

People can underestimate just how hard adaptations can be. You have to please two sets of people: the stalwart fans who know everything about the book, and those who have never read a single page. Because of that, more often than not, one of those parties goes home a little bit disappointed. That is not even close to the case with Good Omens. The series, based on Neil Gaiman’s masterpiece with the same name, follows Crowley (David Tennant) and Aziraphale (Michael Sheen) as they decide just what it is they’re going to do about the end of the world. Do they get involved? Do they let humanity go extinct? As an angel and a demon, you can imagine the two unlikely best friends have some varying opinions and motives. If the show weren’t already stunning enough, Tennant and Sheen ended up being truly ineffable casting as well.

The Man in the High Castle

Just to get it out of the way; The Man in the High Castle might seem a little too “real” for some right now. However, that doesn’t pull away from this incredibly produced series. The story features an alternative reality where the Nazis won WWII. Their victory throws the world into dystopia, but focuses largely on the United States. Germany and Japan split the states into the Greater Nazi Reich and the Japanese Pacific States. Meanwhile, a kind of neutral zone exists somewhere around the Rocky Mountains. The “new” world is turned on its head when protagonists find footage of the Nazis losing the war. The series has wrapped up (totaling in four seasons) so you will, at the very least, have closure should you decide to tackle this exceptional look at what things could have been like had we lost.

The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel

If you need a breath of fresh air, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel is very likely exactly what you’re looking for. The series is a balm. We follow Miriam "Midge" Maisel (Rachel Brosnahan) as she navigates life after her completely mediocre ex-husband left her for his secretary. In the immediate aftermath, a drunk and despairing Midge returns to the comedy club her now-ex once tried to perform and delivers a knock-out impromptu set that will set the scene for the rest of the series. It’s the type of show that’s smart enough that it will hit home for everyone in one way or another, but I especially recommend it to women and all the single mothers out there.

The Expanse

Isn’t it nice to think of a future where humans manage to colonize the solar system? The Expanse explores the very idea, but it’s not afraid to illustrate the very real dangers that humanity would find itself in, in such a scenario. We’re not talking Lost in Space monster issues, either. We’re talking conspiracies and cold wars and all the ways that humans fail themselves pretty regularly. And, yeah, there is a space monster here and there!

Fleabag

Home of the Hot Priest (Andrew Scott) and, well, Fleabag (Phoebe Waller-Bridge), Fleabag follows its title character as she finds her footing after a tragedy. The London-based dramedy is every bit as dry as you’d expect, but what a lot of viewers weren’t anticipating was the level of depth that would come with a series that very sincerely has a grief-ridden woman who spurns anyone who ever tries to connect with her falling in love with a priest. Fleabag also happens to be based on Waller-Bridge’s one-woman show of the same name that she put on in 2013.

The Tick

Remakes are hard. Live-action remakes are even harder – but the truth is that The Tick was never really given its fair shake. The live-action adaption of Ben Edlund’s comic book “The Tick” (and the cartoon series of the same name) was widely agreed to be stellar by both fans and critics. The problem is, the number of fans and critics that watched the show were far fewer than they needed to be to justify the production of the series. We follow our invulnerable hero in his bright blue suit as he defends his city from anyone who dare threaten it. He and his trusty sidekick Arthur (Griffin Newman) fight the nasties of the underworld and take on their arch nemesis The Terror (Jackie Earle Haley) in order to keep their friends and neighbors safe. Honestly, how could we let go of Peter Serafinowicz as The Tick?